Call for Papers: 7th Edition of the Image Conference, Athens 2018

athens-acropolis

 

We are delighted to announce that the Call for Papers for the seventh edition of the Image Conference, the annual conference of the Visual Arts Circle, which will be held on 6th and 7th October at New York College, in Athens, Greece, is now open.

 

Thank you for wanting to submit a speaker proposal for The Image Conference 2018, Athens, Greece.

We would appreciate it if you would take a moment to read through these speaker guidelines to help you, us and the delegates get the most out of the conference.
The deadline for proposals is Friday 8th June. Notification of acceptance of proposals will take place on Friday 6th July. Once you have been accepted to speak, you will receive a provisional acceptance email.

 

Prospective speakers for the conference are kindly asked to submit abstracts for talks or workshops – 50 words maximum. All proposals must be related to the use of images in language teaching and learning. Topics can include:

  • images
  • video
  • film
  • gaming
  • art
  • mental imagery
  • virtual reality and
  • augmented reality.

As Greece is at the epicentre of the refugee crisis in Europe, we encourage proposals related to using images when teaching English to refugees and/or when teaching about refugees through English.

 

Proposals should be chosen in line with the following presentation categories:
• Workshop (45 minutes, including questions): A workshop is a session in which there is active audience participation via the experiencing and discussing of tasks provided by the presenter.
• Talk (45 minutes, including questions): A talk tells the delegates something about teaching English through images.
Please also submit your bio-data ( maximum 50 words).

Are you speaking on behalf of a publisher or institution?
If so, please make this very clear. Delegates are likely to be disappointed if a session they attended based on the description in the abstract turns out to be an advertisement for a publication, product, or course. The submissions of speaker proposals for commercial presentations are welcomed but, if you are basing your presentation either in part or in full on a newly or recently published material, you should clearly say this in your abstract.

Is the information in your abstract clear?
Be explicit about whether you are offering a talk, a commercial presentation or a hands-on workshop. We want to be sure that when delegates register for sessions, they can do so on the basis of accurate information.

You can download these guidelines for submission of proposals guidelines-for-speakers-athens-2018

 

Please submit your proposal by completing this form by Friday 8th June.

 

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Global Issues SIG and Visual Arts Circle Pre-Conference Event – Brighton 9th April 2018

Social Justice and ELT through the Visual Arts – GISIG and Visual Arts Circle Joint PCE

Visual images can be arresting and powerful. We have all at some point in our lives been stunned by a photograph or painting that has resonated with us – the Afghani girl on the cover of National Geographic or Picasso’s Guernica. These images can provoke strong emotions, engage us critically and sometimes inspire radical action so how might we capitalise on this in our professional lives and exploit visuals effectively in our teaching and training?

 

Come to the GISIG PCE at Brighton, run jointly with the Visual Arts Circle this year, to discover new and innovative ways of exploring themes of social justice through the visual medium.

 

IATEFL Conference early bird registration ends THIS THURSDAY (11th January) at 4 pm.

Booking info

More info on our PCE:

 

Do you want to know more about how to incorporate still and moving images into classroom materials to get students reflecting on social issues? Or capitalise on your own artistic skills to provoke discussion and debate in your classrooms?

Using Film as a Medium for Global Issues in the English Language Classroom

Our diverse and talented group of speakers will be presenting their ideas on how we can do this. Margarita Kosior, writer, teacher and storyteller will outline how film as a medium can introduce difficult topics into the classroom domain and encourage students to discuss them with confidence and ease. Gergo Fekete, dynamic teacher and GISIG Social Media Coordinator, will show us how to raise awareness of social justice issues for women from his MA thesis related to excerpts from the film ‘Girl Rising’.

Tools for Exploring the Arts, Collaborative Hands On Projects and a Drawing Class!

Emma-Louise Pratt is a practising artist and educator who will work at various times throughout the day with PCE participants to produce a collaborative artwork which will be displayed in public for the duration of the conference. Dimitris Tzouris brings his technical expertise to our PCE and explains how we can use Google Arts and Culture as a tool to explore and understand the world through art and stories. And for those of us who think we don’t possess any artistic skills Jade Blue, a teacher and teacher-trainer with a special interest in using imagery in ELT, will guide us through a session on teacher-drawing and learner-drawing tasks that seek to examine how these practical activities can be applied in our classrooms to explore global issues themes such as human rights.

Finally, rounding off the day’s events Kieran Donaghy and Anna Whitcher, founders of the Visual Arts Circle, will explore how different resources created by VAC members can be used to promote social justice through the visual arts in the English language classroom.

 

PCE Schedule: Download (PDF)

 

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Visual Literacy in the Language Curriculum

sylvia-karastathi

To inaugurate the website of the Visual Arts Circle we have invited Dr. Sylvia Karastathi of New York College, Athens, Greece who has a PhD and post-doctoral studies from the University of Cambridge, to write about the increasing important role of visual literacy in English language teaching.

Few language teachers can claim that they never use still or moving images in their lessons; yet, this standard practice is rarely touched upon in teacher training curricula on the assumption the way to introduce images into lessons is self-evident. This short article starts by introducing some key ELT resources on using images in the classroom; it then goes on to argue that we need to approach images not simply as an aid but as a key component of “multimodal communicative competence”.

The Status of the Image

In his 1966 ground-breaking study The Visual Element in Language Teaching Pit Corder made the useful distinction between “talking about images” and “talking with images”, differentiating between physical description and personal response. Since then, practical books such as Andrew Wright’s Pictures for Language Learning (1990), Jamie Keddie’s Images (2009), Ben Goldstein’s Working with Images (2009) and Peter Grundy’s et. al. English Through Art (2011) have suggested a wide variety of engaging activities that exploit the power of still images in the classroom and demonstrate their potentials to facilitate language learning. More recently, principled uses of the moving image in the classroom have become the focus of discussion in ELT with publications such as Ben Goldstein and Paul Diver’s Language Learning with Digital Video (2014) and Kieran Donaghy’s Film in Action (2015).

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