Registration for the Image Conference,Athens, is now open

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Poster Image Conference with Website

Registration for the Image Conference in Athens on 6th and 7th October is now open.

The Image Conference is the annual conference of the Visual Arts Circle, and this year it is being hosted and co-organised by New York College, Athens with the collaboration of the Global Issues SIG of IATEFL. Leading experts and practitioners in the use of images in language learning will share their experiences, insights and know-how and provide participants with an excellent opportunity to enhance their competence in the innovative, critical and creative use of images in language education.

We look forward to seeing you in historic and vibrant Athens.

Emma L. Pratt at the IATEFL Conference Brighton 2018

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One of our VAC members, Emma L. Pratt, was invited to participate in a innovative way at IATEFL 2018.

Header Image: Detail from “The Ecosytem”, in response to the first plenary about the relationship between research and the classroom.

Being Invited to be the Artist in Residence at IATEFL in Brighton 2018

When I was invited to be the artist in residence at IATEFL in Brighton this year, I jumped at the chance. I had already been talking about artists’ residencies in learning at our Image Conference  http://theimageconference.org/emma-louise-pratt-talks-about-her-session-at-the-image-conference/ and especially language learning contexts, and I was keen to develop my own practice and build on my knowledge from having coordinated artists in schools in New Zealand.

The Pre-Conference Day for the GISIG

I had also been invited to participate in the Visual Arts Circle’s facilitation of the Global Issues SIG PCE day. This was an opportunity to explore workshop as performance; an artwork in itself. I had used video and storytelling to lead delegates into a space where they were invited to express their own personal thoughts and stories visually on the theme of social justice.

The Visual Arts in IATEFL 2018

Over the four days of the conference I made work that responded to the guest plenary speakers of IATEFL. I was daunted by the prospect of having to produce “something” under pressure on a topic that was not of my choosing. Added to that, having to do it in public. In short, a difficult brief that is almost counter-creative. Not everyone can do it, but I have a secret weapon. Children and a day job.

My arts practice has long fitted itself around the requirements of co-raising children, co-running a home and co-running a small company. When you are this busy, you become very efficient in the art of filtering noise, stealing moments and giving space to let ideas bubble and process. When I can’t physically make with my hands, I see it in my mind’s eye: images, shapes, colours, all coming and going.

I’ve heard it called “El rio bajo rio” the underground river. All practised creatives know that this river of creativity is flowing even when it’s apparently built over with the day to day needs asked of you. There it flows in the dark velvety deep.

The Teaching Artist

The concept of a teaching artist is perhaps a new idea in language teaching circles. However, in arts circles, it’s a term well used, especially in the United States. You may have heard the concept described sometimes as the participative artist, collaborative artist, the citizen artist and activist artist.

These are all ways to describe artists who move and shapeshift, finding their practice to be something that covers both the making of art works and interaction with a community.

These acts of art making take place away from the sometimes exclusive or problematic world of galleries and museums. They take place in the forms of residencies, performances and workshops in classrooms, public spaces and in my case this April 2018, at the IATEFL conference in Brighton.

Slow Digestion

My temporary art studio, with its work in progress provided chance for reflection. I only had one plenary to digest slowly for the day. Meanwhile, others dashed about in front of me, often asking me hurriedly if room 11 was anywhere near.

Conferences cause a sense of rush. We often need to “doggy bag” our thoughts and reactions, in order to sit down at the next meal. One workshop or presentation after another blurs into a degustation menu that is presented too fast, the plates taken away too suddenly.

I on the other hand, had the space to slow it all down. People could, and did, come and pull up a chair and chat with me as I worked or wandered about the visual work I was creating and peered over my shoulder.

Giving Silence a Place

During the GISIG preconference day, in the first playful stage of our workshop, I noticed that the room had fallen silent.  Everyone had been asked to pick up brushes and in and water and simply play with the material on watercolour paper. It was a stage designed to loosen everyone up and introduce them to the materials before we got on to more serious matters.

I had expected chatter, but what I found was silence. A silent room. One delegate described it as if the act of watching the ink absorb in the paper made our bodies and minds slow down too. Perhaps we could consider more space for that.”

Emma would like to thank the GISIG, VAC and IATEFL for the invitation as well as her small team at Frameworks Education Group who walked the dog, fed and entertained the children and held generally held the fort, enabling her to be there. 😉

Emma Louise Pratt IATEFL Artist in Residence Brighton, 2018.


 

Anna Whitcher & Kieran Donaghy: GISIG & Visual Arts Circle Joint PCE

Social Justice and ELT through the Visual Arts

Last March, Anna Whitcher and Kieran Donaghy presented at the GISIG and Visual Arts Circle Joint PCE.   In this session , they looked at a number of resources such as projects, resource websites, lesson plans and publications which promote social justice in English language teaching, created by members of the Visual Arts Circle, a community of practice of language teaching professionals with a shared interest in the value of using the visual arts in language education.

 

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These are the resources presented in the session:

 

 

 

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Judy BoyleThe NO Project

 

 

The No Project

 

http://www.thenoproject.org/

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The NO Project is an award-winning, global, educational anti-slavery campaign that specifically targets youth awareness of modern slavery and human trafficking through film, music, art, dance, theatre, journalism, creative writing, education and social media. The project was set up and run by Judy Boyle.

 

Naomi Epstein – Visualising Ideas

 

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https://visualisingideas.edublogs.org/

 

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Naomi Epstein is a teacher of deaf and hard of hearing children in a secondary school in Israel. She created her website Visualising Ideas to share her materials and ideas on how to use the visual arts with deaf and hard of hearing children in the language classroom.

 

 

Chrysa Papalazarou – Art Least

 

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https://chrysapapalazarou.wordpress.com/

 

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Art Least is a site created by Chrysa Papalazarou, an English teacher from Greece who works in a state primary school. Her site explores ways of using art in English language teaching and learning, promoting social justice, and a more thoughtful and creative flow in the English classroom

 

Linda Ruas – Easier English Wiki

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Linda Ruas – Easier English Wiki

 

https://eewiki.newint.org

 

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Linda Ruas is a trainer of ESOL teachers and an ESOL teacher at a London college. She is also Joint Coordinator of IATEFL Global Issues SIG.

The Easier English Wiki provides the same texts and photos that New Internationalist magazine offers, but with easier vocabulary and grammar. This content covers the issues many English language students are living with or experiencing, or issues that are vital to understand in today’s world. Learners can learn English, reading the simplified article and then the original, develop critical thinking and visual literacy skills, and break down barriers at the same time.

 

Kieran Donaghy – Film English

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http://film-english.com/

 

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Kieran Donaghy is a teacher, trainer and writer based in Barcelona. His website Film English has a large number of lesson plans designed around short films which promote social justice and universal values such as compassion, kinness and equality in the language classroom.

publications

 

 

 

The Image in English Language Teaching (ELT Council)

Edited by Kieran Donaghy and Daniel Xerri

The book can be downloaded for free:

https://visualartscircle.com/the-image-in-elt-book/

 

The Image in ELT

The Image in English Language Teaching is the first publication of the Visual Arts Circle in collaboration with the Maltese ELT Council. It’s a collection of 18 chapters inspired by talks at the first five editions of the Image Conference. Two chapters are on how art can be used to promote peace and social justice in the language classroom:

 

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Peace art: words and images interwoven

by Magdalena Brzezinska

 

 

Images on canvas: art, thinking and creativity in ELT

by Chrysa Papalazarou

 

 

For anyone interested, here is their powerpoint presentation and description.Social Justice and the Visual Arts in English Language Teaching Handout

PDF PCE VAC Social Justice and Visual Arts in ELT

Jade Blue: Workshop in the Visual Arts Circle and Global Issues SIG PCE, IATEFL 2018

We are delighted to present a write up of Jade Blue’s workshop in the Visual Arts Circle and Global Issues SIG pre-conference event at IATEFL 2018 last March in Brighton. This is the first of the workshops/talks from the joint even at IATEFL we are going to present here.

 

Drawing in the ELT Classroom to Explore Social Justice

 

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This was a practical workshop session applying practical teacher-drawing and learner-drawing tasks to explore issues of social justice and human rights.

 

Why Global Issues and the Visual Arts?  What’s the link?

 

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Those of us attending the PCE were doing so because we’re interested in, and recognise, either (or both) the power of visuals, and the importance of Global Issues in English language teaching.  The visual arts have the power to trigger deeper discussion and engagement with a topic.  We, and our students, are global citizens, of a world in which themes such as social justice and human rights are becoming increasingly important.

I believe that these things need to be talked about.  One of the many things we’re doing as language teachers is helping to ‘grow’ a shared language – a lingua franca – with which we can talk about such things.  The visual arts have the power to help us do that.

 

 

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But Why Drawing?

How does the act of drawing differ from just looking at someone else’s visual? In a nutshell, the act of drawing as a way of exploring language leads to a deeper and more personalised, memorable connection.  The workshop demonstrated and tried out learner-led and teacher-led drawing tasks.

The learner-led tasks are designed to act as a launchpad, or springboard, for discussion, with learners working in pairs or groups to share and generate ideas.  These tasks looked at what a child in today’s world needs to survive and thrive, and the relationship between society and the individual, although the activities can be adapted for a range of related topics.

The teacher-led task, a PICTOGLOSS, is designed to aid learner comprehension of stories and language.   In the PCE session, we looked at a story entitled ‘Teacup’ by Rebecca Young.  Whilst telling the story the teacher illustrates it on the whiteboard and the learners then use these visuals to verbally reconstruct and discuss the content of the story.  Again, the Pictogloss activity can be adapted to work with a wide variety of text types.

 

Jade Blue’s slides from her workshop can be viewed here JADE BLUE Drawing in the ELT Classroom to Explore Social Justice

Jade Blue 2018

 


Header Image: “Satellite View of The Road to Arlit, Niger” The Road to Arlit is a dangerous passage way for human traffic and economic migration. This is a detail of a carbon and pencil drawing. Artist Emma L Pratt drew every detail of the topography of this area as a reflection upon reading about the discovery of the bodies of 92 people who died of thirst after their vehicles broke down as they tried to cross the Sahara.

Call for Papers: 7th Edition of the Image Conference, Athens 2018

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We are delighted to announce that the Call for Papers for the seventh edition of the Image Conference, the annual conference of the Visual Arts Circle, which will be held on 6th and 7th October at New York College, in Athens, Greece, is now open.

 

Thank you for wanting to submit a speaker proposal for The Image Conference 2018, Athens, Greece.

We would appreciate it if you would take a moment to read through these speaker guidelines to help you, us and the delegates get the most out of the conference.
The deadline for proposals is Friday 8th June. Notification of acceptance of proposals will take place on Friday 6th July. Once you have been accepted to speak, you will receive a provisional acceptance email.

 

Prospective speakers for the conference are kindly asked to submit abstracts for talks or workshops – 50 words maximum. All proposals must be related to the use of images in language teaching and learning. Topics can include:

  • images
  • video
  • film
  • gaming
  • art
  • mental imagery
  • virtual reality and
  • augmented reality.

As Greece is at the epicentre of the refugee crisis in Europe, we encourage proposals related to using images when teaching English to refugees and/or when teaching about refugees through English.

 

Proposals should be chosen in line with the following presentation categories:
• Workshop (45 minutes, including questions): A workshop is a session in which there is active audience participation via the experiencing and discussing of tasks provided by the presenter.
• Talk (45 minutes, including questions): A talk tells the delegates something about teaching English through images.
Please also submit your bio-data ( maximum 50 words).

Are you speaking on behalf of a publisher or institution?
If so, please make this very clear. Delegates are likely to be disappointed if a session they attended based on the description in the abstract turns out to be an advertisement for a publication, product, or course. The submissions of speaker proposals for commercial presentations are welcomed but, if you are basing your presentation either in part or in full on a newly or recently published material, you should clearly say this in your abstract.

Is the information in your abstract clear?
Be explicit about whether you are offering a talk, a commercial presentation or a hands-on workshop. We want to be sure that when delegates register for sessions, they can do so on the basis of accurate information.

You can download these guidelines for submission of proposals guidelines-for-speakers-athens-2018

 

Please submit your proposal by completing this form by Friday 8th June.

 

The Visual Arts Circle at the Virtual Round Table Web Conference

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We are delighted to announce the Visual Arts Circle is going  live on the Virtual Round Table Friday this 27th at 7pm CET for a few hours of take-aways for your classroom from the people behind the Image Conference.  With Kieran Donaghy, Rob Howard, Magdalena Brzezinska, Magdalena Wasilewska and Valeria Benevolo Franca.

Make sure you join us !

https://t.co/KuZpUuKicc  @VisuaArtsCircle #ImageInELT #VisualELT https://t.co/Ps3J1ozKuk

Global Issues SIG and Visual Arts Circle Pre-Conference Event – Brighton 9th April 2018

Social Justice and ELT through the Visual Arts – GISIG and Visual Arts Circle Joint PCE

Visual images can be arresting and powerful. We have all at some point in our lives been stunned by a photograph or painting that has resonated with us – the Afghani girl on the cover of National Geographic or Picasso’s Guernica. These images can provoke strong emotions, engage us critically and sometimes inspire radical action so how might we capitalise on this in our professional lives and exploit visuals effectively in our teaching and training?

 

Come to the GISIG PCE at Brighton, run jointly with the Visual Arts Circle this year, to discover new and innovative ways of exploring themes of social justice through the visual medium.

 

IATEFL Conference early bird registration ends THIS THURSDAY (11th January) at 4 pm.

Booking info

More info on our PCE:

 

Do you want to know more about how to incorporate still and moving images into classroom materials to get students reflecting on social issues? Or capitalise on your own artistic skills to provoke discussion and debate in your classrooms?

Using Film as a Medium for Global Issues in the English Language Classroom

Our diverse and talented group of speakers will be presenting their ideas on how we can do this. Margarita Kosior, writer, teacher and storyteller will outline how film as a medium can introduce difficult topics into the classroom domain and encourage students to discuss them with confidence and ease. Gergo Fekete, dynamic teacher and GISIG Social Media Coordinator, will show us how to raise awareness of social justice issues for women from his MA thesis related to excerpts from the film ‘Girl Rising’.

Tools for Exploring the Arts, Collaborative Hands On Projects and a Drawing Class!

Emma-Louise Pratt is a practising artist and educator who will work at various times throughout the day with PCE participants to produce a collaborative artwork which will be displayed in public for the duration of the conference. Dimitris Tzouris brings his technical expertise to our PCE and explains how we can use Google Arts and Culture as a tool to explore and understand the world through art and stories. And for those of us who think we don’t possess any artistic skills Jade Blue, a teacher and teacher-trainer with a special interest in using imagery in ELT, will guide us through a session on teacher-drawing and learner-drawing tasks that seek to examine how these practical activities can be applied in our classrooms to explore global issues themes such as human rights.

Finally, rounding off the day’s events Kieran Donaghy and Anna Whitcher, founders of the Visual Arts Circle, will explore how different resources created by VAC members can be used to promote social justice through the visual arts in the English language classroom.

 

PCE Schedule: Download (PDF)

 

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